Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Guitarist Likes City, but Wonders How Important Art Is Here

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Guitarist Likes City, but Wonders How Important Art Is Here

Article excerpt

Byline: HEATHER LOVEJOY

At age 11, Goliath Flores set about adding guitar to his repertoire, which already included percussion and piano. When the young Los Angeles native placed his hand around the smooth neck of a guitar and his small fingers curled to meet the strings, his musical journey took a new course.

Now in his early 30s, Flores is probably best known for wielding a classical guitar. His passionate, energetic performances are filled with pop- and jazz-influenced tunes, often with a Latin folk music flare.

Flores made his way to Jacksonville a little more than six years ago, partly for school and partly for a woman. Since moving here, the singer/songwriter has lived in Riverside, Avondale, Arlington and on the Southside, but now calls Springfield home.

River City News recently asked Flores a few questions about living and playing in Jacksonville.

Q: WHAT ATTRACTS YOU TO SPRINGFIELD?

I like the mixture of cultures in Springfield, and I enjoy the look of the unrestored houses as much as the restored ones. I like to bring people here, and I notice that the more they come to Springfield, the less they see it as a "rough" neighborhood.

Q: AT WHAT JACKSONVILLE VENUE(S) DO YOU MOST ENJOY PLAYING, AND WHY?

My current favorite place to play is the Casbah [Cafe]. It is . . . open after 10 p.m. and is always thriving with nightlife. The staff there is very supportive of the arts, and they treat their artists as valuable people in society.

My other favorite is playing for [the program] "Body & Soul" at various hospitals. We do "room service," which is playing at people's bedsides. . . . Sometimes I think that music belongs more in hospitals than in bars or restaurants.

Q: YOU'VE PLAYED OUT IN SAN FRANCISCO, DALLAS AND OTHER MAJOR CITIES -- HOW DO GIGS IN JACKSONVILLE COMPARE?

The majority of venues in Jacksonville use music as part of their ambience. Consequently, the majority of people are partly listening. …

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