Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Room Squeeze on for UGa Students; for a While, at Least, Some Are Bunking Down in Spacious Study Halls

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Room Squeeze on for UGa Students; for a While, at Least, Some Are Bunking Down in Spacious Study Halls

Article excerpt

Byline: REBECCA K. QUIGLEY

ATHENS -- More freshmen and limited campus housing means that about 40 new University of Georgia students will have to live in study hall rooms for the first few days of school until space becomes available.

Freshman Bonnie Bounds of Washington found out a couple of weeks ago that her room is "supplementary" housing, which turned out to be a much larger space than she expected.

"I was afraid of some teeny-tiny room," said Bounds, who, as fall semester classes start today, will share a fifth-floor lounge in Brumby Hall with Sydney Slotkin of Decatur and Denisse Morgado of San Juan, Puerto Rico.

The handful of rooms around campus that housing staff identify for supplementary housing each fall semester will empty soon as some students cancel their room reservations, said Shay Davis, residence hall administrative operations director.

"Many will stay exactly where they are," Davis said.

Housing staff eventually will offer regular rooms to the students temporarily housed in the converted lounges and study rooms -- the rooms are outfitted with Internet, cable and other amenities that regular rooms have -- but those who want to stay are allowed to, she said.

Before the 1,200-student East Campus Village dormitories opened in 2003 -- the same year freshmen first were required to live on campus -- the university "had much larger overflows" of students into supplementary housing, said UGa spokesman Tom Jackson.

About 6,800 students will live in the 20 residence halls this fall while about 90 percent of the approximate 5,000-student freshman class live in the halls, according to housing records.

The number of students placed in supplementary housing has not varied much in the past few years, Jackson said.

The Brumby Hall trio said they wouldn't mind having a regular room next year, but they want to stay the year in the larger-than-average room that other residents on their floor are jaw-droppingly jealous of. …

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