Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

SHE DIED IN MY ARMS-; Tearful Brown Tells of Grief over His Lost Daughter

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

SHE DIED IN MY ARMS-; Tearful Brown Tells of Grief over His Lost Daughter

Article excerpt

Byline: JOE MURPHY

JOE MURPHY Political Editor

GORDON BROWN today spoke of the terrible moment his baby daughter died in his arms.

With tears welling in his eyes, the Chancellor described his last moments with Jennifer Jane, who died at 10 days old.

"She was unblemished by the illness that she had," said Mr Brown. "She just looked beautiful and, er, you know..."

His voice tailed off and then he added quietly: "She... she died in our arms."

Mr Brown's emotional words come at the very time that Jennifer would have been starting school had she lived.

"There is nothing worse than having a young, precious baby taken from you," he said. "And you never come to terms with it. You always know that there's something missing.

"Two weeks ago she would have been going to school for the first time. You know that ... you try to do things that make life better so it's had a purpose, that something good can come out of the tragedy."

Mr Brown's voice faltered during the interview with Sky News anchorwoman Kay Burley when she asked how he would remember Jennifer who died from a brain haemorrhage in January 2002.

"We had seven or eight wonderful days, we didn't know she was going to die until the last days," he said. "So we had very, very happy days."

He went on: "It's very tough for any parents faced with a loss that you never expect, that's so surprising, that you have to come to terms with.

"And because you want something good to come of it ... that's why Sarah and I are interested in what we can do to help other parents in the same position."

It is the first time that Mr Brown has talked at such length about the death of Jennifer and comes as Labour MPs and members face a leadership contest in which he is frontrunner.

Although a notably private person, the Chancellor accepts that he must reveal more of his personality before asking people to vote for him as prime minister. …

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