Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

In the News

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

In the News

Article excerpt

WINNERS ...

Wall Street: The Dow Jones Industrial is within 100 points of 14,000 after a record-setting week. How high can it go?

Burial of the N-word: The NAACP delivers a strike against racist language with their funeral during their annual convention in Detroit.

The Beckhams: As they set up shop in the U.S., Posh and Becks win lots of publicity -- including a one-hour NBC special Monday.

... AND LOSERS

Sen. David Vitter: The Louisiana abstinence proponent took a week off after his name turned up on the D.C. Madam's phone list.

Sen. John McCain: Granted his week wasn't as bad as his colleague Vitter's, but his presidential campaign is certainly sputtering.

Wigs for judges: In a cost-cutting (and face-saving?) move, England lets civil and family court judges dispense with the horsehair monstrosities.

BUY A VOWEL

ALL THAT'S MISSING FROM NASA'S BANNER IS 'U'

NASA is apparently much better with numbers than letters. Last week, one of NASA's shuttles arrived at its launch pad, and officials hung a banner reading "Go Endeavor." The problem: The name is spelled the British way, with a "U". That's "Endeavour." The name is a reference to the first ship commanded by 18th century British explorer James Cook. The banner was up for about 90 minutes before being replaced by one with the correct spelling. Endeavour's launch is set for Aug. 7.

Associated Press

NO MORE FORBIDDEN LATTE

BEING STARBUCKS IS NOT ALLOWED IN THIS CITY

Starbucks has closed a coffeehouse in China's former imperial palace, the company said Saturday, ending a presence that sparked protests by Chinese critics who said it damaged a key historical site. The controversy over Starbucks at Beijing's 587-year-old Forbidden City has highlighted Chinese sensitivity about cultural symbols and unease over an influx of foreign pop culture. Starbucks closed the 200-square-foot outlet Friday after Forbidden City managers decided they wanted all shops on its grounds to operate under the palace's brand name, said Eden Woon, Starbucks' vice president for Greater China. …

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