Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Think before You Shop; the North-East Faces Millions in Fines If Council Chiefs Fail to Cut the Amount of Waste Dumped into the Ground in the Coming Years. Families and Businesses Will Be Asked to Change the Way They Live and Operate to Help Avoid the Tough Penalties

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Think before You Shop; the North-East Faces Millions in Fines If Council Chiefs Fail to Cut the Amount of Waste Dumped into the Ground in the Coming Years. Families and Businesses Will Be Asked to Change the Way They Live and Operate to Help Avoid the Tough Penalties

Article excerpt

Byline: Paul James reports

PEOPLE are being asked to change their way of life to take recycling in the North to an all-time high.

While the moves could prevent thousands of tonnes of rubbish entering the waste chain and find new ways of reusing more goods than ever before, they would involve big changes in our attitudes and shopping.

The council-backed initiatives include a huge expansion in home composting, campaigns to convince hundreds more parents to buy reusable nappies, slash the packaging in which goods are bought, and sharing community tools such as lawnmowers and ladders.

In addition, campaigns would aim to slash the amount of rubbish dumped illegally by businesses at council waste centres and enrol thousands of homes in a programme that stamps out unwanted mail.

It is hoped the different schemes can increase the amount recycled and composted to 45% of all the waste in areas such as Gateshead, South Tyneside and Sunderland by 2020, by which time the Government expects councils to have cut landfill waste by almost two-thirds. Green campaigners say it is essential for families to embrace the changes and they insist many are easy to implement.

Gateshead, South Tyneside and Sunderland have teamed up to produce their own waste strategy, which features many initiatives to build on work already taking place in the three authorities.

If all are implemented in those areas, it will cost up to pounds 1.5m, but officers estimate that by 2020 the schemes could cut municipal rubbish by 7.5% - 27,650 tonnes - and save more than pounds 200,000 a year in waste management costs. If applied regionwide, the schemes could cut waste by 70,000 tonnes.

The most basic additions to the amount currently recycled include collecting a wider range of materials at council sites and in kerbside boxes, such as plastic, textiles, card and kitchen waste. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.