Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Meet the Double Life Londoners; Everything's Coming Up Roses: Jamie and Tanya Spend Most of the Year in France Selling Wine at Local Markets and the Winters Back in London

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Meet the Double Life Londoners; Everything's Coming Up Roses: Jamie and Tanya Spend Most of the Year in France Selling Wine at Local Markets and the Winters Back in London

Article excerpt

'I QUIT THE RAT RACE'

Jamie Ivey, a solicitor in his thirties, set up a business selling wine in theSouth of France and in London THE idea of running a wine business occurred tome on a hot August day in the South of France. My lunch was accompanied by theheavy beat of cicadas and the smell of wild herbs. All around diners werefishing cool bottles of pale pink wine from icy buckets. Rosetraditionally seen as the poor cousin of red and foie lawyer. wrong enjoyedhours wife, commons, and, house and End..

and white wine was being drunk with foie gras and grilled fillet steaks.

At the time I was working as a City lawyer. Like many others I always feltwrong for my job. My actual life, the one I enjoyed living, consisted ofsnatched hours when I could spend time with my wife, Tanya.

We lived in Balham, walked on the commons, met friends in the local bars and,like everyone else, gossiped about house prices. Tanya was working as a filmand entertainment publicist in the West End. Looking after celebrities mightsound glamorous but the reality was more mundane.

Depressed at the prospect of going back to our London offices, we thought: "Whynot ride the trend and set up a bar in Provence and offer a wine list composedexclusively of roses?" We quit our jobs that winter and headed to France withthe aim of buying a bar near Aix-en- Provence, but quickly discovered that oncelocal bar owners got a sniff of an English purchaser they performed amazingfeats of mental arithmetic.

Because of the inflated prices we barshared

Everything's coming up roses: Jamie for a while, pleading with various ownersto let us convert half of their terrace into a rose bar in return for aguaranteed rent.

It was a glorious summer and we made more than enough money to supportourselves, but lurking at the back of my mind were a host of problemswe couldn't be nomads for ever, and we couldn't just throw away money on arented bar. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.