Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Dazzling Dublin; (1) [Pounds Sterling]2.7 Million: A Former Virgin Megastore Now Houses Dublin's Latest Swish Penthouse. Call 00 35 31 663 4300 (2) New Cafes and Bars Have Opened Up along the Liffey

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Dazzling Dublin; (1) [Pounds Sterling]2.7 Million: A Former Virgin Megastore Now Houses Dublin's Latest Swish Penthouse. Call 00 35 31 663 4300 (2) New Cafes and Bars Have Opened Up along the Liffey

Article excerpt

Byline: Cathy Hawker

THE Irish economy has been an economic wunderkind for 10 years: lowunemployment, low taxes and a ready influx of willing workers from new EUstates have combined to create dynamic growth rates and make Ireland thethird-richest country in Europe.

Property prices have risen an eye-watering 270 per cent over the decade, butwith seven successive interest-rate hikes and concerns about the ability of itseconomy to sustain such rocketing growth, is the Celtic Tiger losing its roar?Well, you wouldn't think so in Dublin, where the price of property is still thehottest topic on the streets. The property boom has proved unstoppable sincethe mid-Nineties, says Roisin McNeela of agent Savills Hamilton Osborne King."Increases peaked in March to May 2006, but with our rapidly expandingpopulation the buy-to-let market remains very active. The recent election andspeculation about changes to stampduty rates mean the market has cooled, butdemand for city-centre apartments is particularly strong, and we expect priceincreases of about five per cent for 2007." Her firm has property for sale inDublin from [pounds sterling]173,500 to [pounds sterling]8.15 million. Four-bedroom houses in North Dublin gofor about [pounds sterling]650,000, but can rise to more than [pounds sterling]2 million in swish areas such asRanelagh or Monkstown. All sales are in euros.

Apartments springing up in the revamped Docklands area are doing particularlywell. A two-bedroom waterside flat there can cost nearly [pounds sterling]500,000, double theprice of a similar property elsewhere in the city centre..

Setting a new standard A PENTHOUSE breaking records in Dublin is in the AstonBuilding, a 3,282sq ft flat near O'Connell Street with two bedrooms, no parkingand a [pounds sterling]2.7 million price tag. What makes it so special is not just itslocation, overlooking the Liffey, but its interior by celebrated designerAndree Putman. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.