Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Sandalwood High Becomes the Eighth Full Service School

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Sandalwood High Becomes the Eighth Full Service School

Article excerpt

Byline: JOHN CARTER

Sandalwood has long been an icon at the border of the Arlington and Southside areas.

The high school's direct and incidental impacts on both communities has been far-reaching and profound.

Now that impact will be magnified exponentially as Sandalwood High becomes the city's eighth Full Service School beginning Nov. 1.

The school will serve many young people and their parents with a variety of social, educational, health and referral services. Through the agencies that partner to support Full Service Schools, those in need can be assisted in applying for food stamps, locating food banks, finding clothing ministries or locating any social service that may be needed.

The Full Service Schools concept, a United Way-led initiative begun in 1991 in Jacksonville, brings together several community agencies and organizations to help meet the health and psychological needs of academically at-risk students.

And the impact will be profound because, as is typical of Full Service Schools, Sandalwood will serve as a hub, providing services to the surrounding community and about 10 surrounding feeder schools in Arlington and Southside, said Ross McDonough, Full Servide Schools manager.

"This will be a tremendous resource for both students and their families," he said.

McDonough said funding for the Sandalwood Full Service School is being provided by Wayne and Delores Weaver.

The other seven Full Service School Centers are at or near Andrew Jackson High, Englewood High, Fletcher High, Annie R. Morgan Elementary, Ribault High, Terry Parker High and Oak Hill Elementary.

McDonough said Full Service Schools improve student attendance and behavior by helping students and their families deal with the behavioral and environmental issues that can interfere with successful classroom performance.

Services include mental health counseling, behavioral treatment, case management and mentoring. United Way of Northeast Florida is the lead agency for the program and partners with Duval County Public Schools, the Jacksonville Children's Commission, the Duval County Health Department and the Florida Department of Children and Families. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.