Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Greenbelt Feels the Heat from Flooding; Commercial Property Quarterly Review Who's Planning What? Ward Hadaway

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Greenbelt Feels the Heat from Flooding; Commercial Property Quarterly Review Who's Planning What? Ward Hadaway

Article excerpt

Byline: By Andrew Moss

FLOODING risk has always been a difficult issue for developers to tackle and it remains a concern for planning development.

Historically, many towns, homes and other buildings have been built on flood plains where they are highly susceptible to flooding. This happened for several reasons including this is where water was most readily available; flood plain land was usually the most fertile for farming; rivers represented cheap sources of transportation, and were often where railways were located; and flat land is easier to develop than hilly land. The difficulties with this simplistic approach to development location are obvious. As we enter another winter the appropriate authorities and residents brace themselves against the ever-increasing likelihood of flooded homes and businesses.

Is there a solution to this problem? One answer would be stop all building from here on in. However this is not a feasiblesolution.People willalways need places to live, work and play. Some answer that the solution is to avoid construction on flood plains.

The advice from central government is to ensure that wherever possible flood plains should not be built upon. To ensure that this happens, the Government has introduced the 'sequential test' advocated by PPS25. This is a test to demonstrate whether a site is susceptible to flooding, and if so is there a better location for that type of development? There are consequences of the sequential test. In many towns and cities the most accessible and best place to develop is closest to the centre where the original historic settlement existed, but which unfortunately is likely to be in the original flood plain. If there is a better site on the edge of the town away from the flood plain this might be deemed a sequentially preferable location.

Is this a problem? It may well be. An edge of town site might be less accessible in terms of proximity to services, schools, jobs and public transport.

Importantly the site might also be a greenfield or a green belt location. Greenfield locations are supposedly less preferable as their development does not include the recycling of wasteland. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.