Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Family Rallies Behind Shelter, Its Furry Friends; Relatives of a Former Glynn Commissioner Are Continuing Her Support with a Festival

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Family Rallies Behind Shelter, Its Furry Friends; Relatives of a Former Glynn Commissioner Are Continuing Her Support with a Festival

Article excerpt

Byline: TERESA STEPZINSKI

BRUNSWICK - Fat Boy is an affable 16-pound orange tabby cat so polite he lets other kitties eat before he chows down.

Brin, an affectionate young brindle hound, was rescued from people who routinely kicked and beat him. Reggie, a year-old black Labrador mix, had a makeshift wire collar embedded deep into his neck when he was saved. Chainee, a dainty gray cat that loves to cuddle, had been tied inside a pillowcase then stuffed under the chain-link gate at Glynn County Animal Services.

Those are just a few of the abandoned, abused or neglected pets available for adoption by loving families during the inaugural Furry Fall Festival to be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Animal Services shelter, 4765 U.S. 17 N., just north of Jetport Road.

The festival also will feature food and fun activities for people and their pets, said Marcia Stewart, animal services director.

"We want people to know that we are here and that we have many fine wonderful animals just waiting to become their loving lifelong friend," Stewart said.

The family of the late Glynn County Commissioner Henri Woodman, who was among the county animal shelter's biggest supporters, organized the festival. Her son, Cliff Woodman, and his wife, Lisa, also are donating the food for the event.

Woodman owned a pet store and, until her death in 2003, was a staunch advocate for animals. She was instrumental in modernizing the shelter and helped establish its mobile adoption unit.

Cliff Woodman and his wife share his late mother's love of animals. The couple are following in his mother's footsteps to raise public awareness about the county shelter and its furry charges.

"My goal is to help get some pets adopted and help raise money for Animal Services," Cliff Woodman said.

The county animal shelter takes in more than 4,000 animals annually, but only a small percentage of those are adopted.

The remainder are humanely euthanized because the facility doesn't have the space or other resources to keep animals indefinitely. …

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