Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Passengers' Fury as Rail Fares Soar by Up to 14.5%; Paddington Protest: Commuters on Theplatform Today Where Some Who Faced Fare Rises of Nearly 1. per Cent Complained of Delays and Frustration and Said the Increases Were Not justifiedPoor Service ... and out of Pocket

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Passengers' Fury as Rail Fares Soar by Up to 14.5%; Paddington Protest: Commuters on Theplatform Today Where Some Who Faced Fare Rises of Nearly 1. per Cent Complained of Delays and Frustration and Said the Increases Were Not justifiedPoor Service ... and out of Pocket

Article excerpt

Byline: DICK MURRAY

RAIL companies faced a backlash from passengers and politicians today asthey raised fares by up to 14.5 per cent.

Anger and frustration boiled over at the ticket offices as theinflation-busting rises hit home.

The train operators, which each make tens of millions of pounds profit, broughtin the highest commuter fare increases allowed under the regulations.

While regulated fares, which include most season tickets and peak-time tickets,have risen by an average of 4.8 per cent, some smashed through the 10 per centmark. MPs, passenger watchdogs, and environmental groups joined the protests.Theresa Villiers, the shadow transport secretary, accused the Government ofrunning the railways "like a Dutch auction" with passengers "priced off trainsand back into their cars".

Under the increases: . All morning and evening peak tickets, including seasonand "Savers" serving London increase by 4.8 per cent on nearly every linethe biggest rise that is permitted by law.

. Southeastern has been given special permission to increase its fares by threeper cent above inflation to pay for additional investment in the service.

. Off-peak rates for cheap day returns, advanced purchase and long distanceopen tickets go up by an average of 5.4 per cent but in many cases by more.

. One-day Travelcards and Travelcard season ticketswhich combine rail, Tube and bus and are run by Transport for Londonrise on average by 3.8 per cent, the July inflation figure on which all risesare based.

The rail companies sought to justify the maximum allowed rises by quotinggovernment policy that they should recoup more of the cost of the service fromthose who use it rather than relying on the taxpayer to subsidise it.

Anthony Smith, chief executive of Passenger Focus, the national rail watchdog,accused the industry of "masking steep rises" on some routes by highlightingaverage increases. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.