Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Wolfson Remembered for Generosity; He Was a Wall Street Wizard. His Horse Won a Triple Crown. but His Care for Others Was Noted

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Wolfson Remembered for Generosity; He Was a Wall Street Wizard. His Horse Won a Triple Crown. but His Care for Others Was Noted

Article excerpt

Byline: JESSIE-LYNNE KERR

Louis E. Wolfson was known for many things.

He was the owner of the last race horse to win the coveted Triple Crown in 1978.

He was known as the boy wonder who made his first million by age 28 and was called The Wizard of Wall Street.

He was known for his philanthropy that placed his family's name on a children's hospital and other facilities in Jacksonville.

But the more than 150 family members and friends who gathered to say goodbye to the former financial giant Thursday at Congregation Ahavath Chesed recalled most fondly his loyalty, humility, compassion and work ethic.

Wolfson, who grew up in Jacksonville, one of eight children of a Lithuanian immigrant junk dealer, died Sunday at his home in Bal Harbour a month shy of his 96th birthday.

He was buried in Temple Cemetery at Evergreen Cemetery.

Eulogies were given by his eldest son, Steve Wolfson Sr.; Monteen Tomberlin, who has worked for Wolfson since 1935; his youngest brother, Nathan Wolfson of Charlotte, N.C.; and Austin Mittler of Potomac, Md., who was Wolfson's friend and attorney for 39 years.

"There are two words to describe my brother Lou," Nathan Wolfson said, "caring and sharing." He told how his older brother, although head of a number of companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange, considered the Wolfson Family Foundation created in 1951 as his pride and joy. He also said his brother, who lost his football scholarship to the University of Georgia when he was injured in a game, later gave generously to the university.

Steve Wolfson said his father "was always there to pick me up or to tell me to get off the canvas," a reference to his dad's participating in boxing as a teenager.

His father was a voracious reader, he said, who placed a high premium on loyalty.

"He was a perfectionist and a taskmaster of the highest order, yet he was the epitome of calmness and humility. His compassion and charity were limitless."

Steve Wolfson said his father often gave to those in need anonymously and was a very generous, but discreet, tipper. …

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