Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

The Badger's Lifestyle Has Always Been Conducive to TB.Warm Dankness and Poor Ventilation

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

The Badger's Lifestyle Has Always Been Conducive to TB.Warm Dankness and Poor Ventilation

Article excerpt

Byline: willy poole

SO, what shall we all be doing in the New Year? Any bright ideas? Tell you what! Let's start a health scare! Well, not start exactly because it's all there, it's just that no one has bolted the wheels on yet.

It is about corn. Say "corn" to an English person and they are likely to think of waving fields of wheat and barley. Say "corn" to an American and it means mile upon mile of what we call maize, covering the mid-Western states. Maize/corn is easy to grow and profitable, the more so because it is now being used to produce fuel. It has always been used as a stock feed. It can also be used to produce corn syrup. This is a brilliant agent for putting flesh on beasts. It also appears in about every sort of fast food for human beasts, where it does a similar job, yea even unto obesity.

Obesity is not "a good thing", but there is another side effect of corn syrup which is not bruited about by the food industry: if you really pig out on this stuff, it can have a bad effect on your immune system, opening the door to other nasties. The two prime examples of victims are badgers and wild pigs. In the places where wild pigs are hunted, the old men will tell you that the pigs do not have the stamina that they used to, when they gained most of their nourishment from the forest floor. These days, given half a chance, they just settle into the huge fields of maize and "pig out". The maize is not good for them and neither is the lack of exercise. The result is that when pushed by hounds they tend to "blow up" in fairly short order.

Badgers are also inordinately fond of maize and will eat great quantities of it if it is available. This over-indulgence leads to obesity and an immune system deficiency. This may well let in nasty things like tuberculosis. The badger's lifestyle has always been conducive to TB.

They live in setts deep underground; these produce excellent security, but poor ventilation. The badgers add to the problem by bringing in fresh bedding: bracken, grass and such which is often wet. …

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