Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Effort to Downplay Unknown Evidence; THE CASE A Prosecutor Was Concerned about the Impact of Hairs Found Not to Be the Suspect's. THE DEFENDANT Chad Heins Served 11 Years in Prison before Getting Freed by New DNA Evidence

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Effort to Downplay Unknown Evidence; THE CASE A Prosecutor Was Concerned about the Impact of Hairs Found Not to Be the Suspect's. THE DEFENDANT Chad Heins Served 11 Years in Prison before Getting Freed by New DNA Evidence

Article excerpt

Byline: PAUL PINKHAM

Only weeks before Chad Heins' murder trial in 1996, a Jacksonville prosecutor sent a memo asking a state crime lab supervisor to downplay findings that stray hairs found on the victim's body came from an unknown person.

"I need to structure your testimony carefully so as to convince the jury that the unknown hairs are insignificant," Assistant State Attorney Stephen Bledsoe wrote in a letter recently obtained by the Times-Union.

In December 1996, a jury convicted Heins of the first-degree murder of his sister-in-law in her Mayport apartment. He was sentenced to life in prison until new DNA tests led to his release last month.

Bledsoe's letter was among thousands of pages of documents examined by Heins' lawyers after a judge allowed re-testing of DNA in the case. Although the attorneys don't believe it affected the outcome of the case, the letter shows a "cavalier disregard for the actual evidence," said Jennifer Greenberg, policy director of the Innocence Project of Florida, which worked for Heins' release.

"It actually made my stomach turn," Greenberg said Tuesday. "This is not a game. This is justice. These are people's lives and they matter and the truth matters."

But State Attorney Harry Shorstein called Bledsoe, who he's known for 35 years, one of the most ethical prosecutors in his office. Bledsoe probably wanted to ensure that the crime lab witness testified about possible explanations for the unknown hairs, Shorstein said.

"I don't like the wording of the letter because I think it does lead to conjecture or suspicion of wrongdoing," he said. "But the important thing is he disclosed that evidence. Steve Bledsoe is about a straight an arrow as any lawyer I've ever worked with."

Bledsoe, who now supervises the State Attorney's Office branch in Nassau County, couldn't be reached Tuesday despite messages left at his office and with a colleague.

He wrote the letter in November 1996 to Suzanne Livingston, an analyst supervisor at the Florida Department of Law Enforcement crime lab in Tallahassee. …

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