Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Diana Death Plot Claims a Blatant Lie Says Angry Ex-Met Chief; Fatal Decision: Former Met Chief Lord Condon at the High Court Today. He Told the Inquest He Pleaded for Princess Diana to Reinstate Her Police Security but She Refused

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Diana Death Plot Claims a Blatant Lie Says Angry Ex-Met Chief; Fatal Decision: Former Met Chief Lord Condon at the High Court Today. He Told the Inquest He Pleaded for Princess Diana to Reinstate Her Police Security but She Refused

Article excerpt

Byline: ROBERT JOBSON, SRI CARMICHAEL

BRITAIN'S former top policeman reacted angrily today to claims that hewas part of a criminal conspiracy to murder Princess Diana.

In a heated exchange with Michael Mansfield QC, representing Mohamed Fayed,Lord Condon told today's inquest into the death of the Princess and Dodi Fayedthat the allegations were a blatant lie".

After questions by Mr Mansfield, the coroner Lord Justice Scott Bakerinterrupted and said: "You do realise, Mr Mansfield, you are accusing LordCondon of being in a criminal conspiracy to murder."

Former Met commissioner Lord Condon, clearly angry, said: "That is a blatantlie and would have been the betrayal of my life. I find your suggestion totallyabhorrent and a disgusting suggestion."

Earlier, the High Court inquest heard how Lord Condon had pleaded for Diana toreinstate her security after she had ditched it. But Diana bluntly refusedbecause she wanted to maintain her private life.

Lord Condon believed that decision cost the Princess her life. He said: "If shehad police protection in Paris I am absolutely convinced those lives would nothave been lost. Sadly, she preferred the privacy of not having policeprotection during her private time." Lord Condon, now retired, said he and hisofficers took "every opportunity to get her to change her mind". Theyrepeatedly urged her to reinstate Scotland Yard bodyguardsparticularly after Prince Charles was attacked in Australia and the IRAceasefire broke down in 1996.

Lord Condon said the police "very stridently" suggested that it would be a goodtime to bring back personal protection.

But Diana repeatedly refused all overtures from Scotland Yard.

Mr Mansfield suggested that Diana had dumped her security because she no longertrusted the police. Lord Condon, under cross-examination, accepted that thatwas "not an unfair response". …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.