Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Town Ready to Send Plastic Bags Packing; POLLUTING CARRIERS COULD BECOME THING OF THE PAST

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Town Ready to Send Plastic Bags Packing; POLLUTING CARRIERS COULD BECOME THING OF THE PAST

Article excerpt

COULD a whole town go plastic carrier bagfree?

Well that's the plan for Morpeth, in Northumberland.

Plastic carrier bags could soon be a thing of the past in the market town in a bid to help the environment.

The town's Chamber of Trade, an alliance of local shopkeepers, and Castle Morpeth Borough Council, are planning to phase out the polluting bags in the town.

Morrisons and Marks & Spencer are among chains with premises in Morpeth which are already looking at ways of cutting their customers' use of disposable carrier bags.

M&S recently announced that from May it will begin to charge 5p for each carrier bag used in its food hall, while Morrisons is to give away 10 million free recyclable bags to customers in May as part of its effort to cut carrier bag use by 25% by the end of this year.

But the Chamber of Trade is keen to get smaller independent retailers to come on board to help the environment.

The initial plan is for the chamber to bulk-buy ecofriendly maize bags, which will break down easily when thrown away or put in a compost bin.

But the long-term aim is to get everyone shopping in Morpeth to use reusable hessian bags and cut the number of plastic carriers going to landfill or littering the North East.

Chamber of Trade member David Pope said: "It's a matter of changing what has become a habit for people over the last 20 years. It's about getting people's minds around that expectation that when you buy something it is put in a bag for you."

The idea came about after stallholders at Morpeth's two weekly markets asked the council for some branded bags to put produce in.

And green-minded councillors thought it would be better to seize the chance to bring in reusable bags, rather than add to the number of plastic bags.

Robert Hindhaugh, Morpeth Council's property and markets officer, said: "Originally the idea was to supply the market traders with biodegradable bags for customers.

It depends how many people we get to come on board, but if we can we will buy in hessian bags. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.