Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

We Saw Piles of Rotting Bodies; (1) Laid Waste: A Town in the Irrawaddy River Delta. Most of the Roofs Are Missing, the Palm Trees Buckled and Broken. Save the Children Said It Expected the Death Toll to Climb to as High as 50,000 (2) Help on the Way: Burmese Soldiers and Volunteers Unload Supplies and Medicines

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

We Saw Piles of Rotting Bodies; (1) Laid Waste: A Town in the Irrawaddy River Delta. Most of the Roofs Are Missing, the Palm Trees Buckled and Broken. Save the Children Said It Expected the Death Toll to Climb to as High as 50,000 (2) Help on the Way: Burmese Soldiers and Volunteers Unload Supplies and Medicines

Article excerpt

Byline: ELLEN WIDDUP

AID workers told today of the scale of the devastation wreaked by theBurmese cyclone.

Andrew Kirkwood, country director in Burma for Save the Children, said reliefworkers had seen harrowing scenes in the worst-hit parts of the country.

One team came across thousands of people killed in one township, he said. Therewere piles of rotting bodies lying on the ground as the water had receded.

Survivors face disease and hunger and aerial pictures show bodies strewn acrossthe rice fields and mountains of rubble washed ashore by the 12ft wave causedby Cyclone Nargis.

Ann Veneman, executive director of UN childrens agency Unicef, said the scaleof the problem was only starting to become apparent and survivors were nowfaced with the added concerns of poor sanitation and a lack of clean water. MsVeneman warned that flooding could lead to outbreaks of malaria and denguefever, while waterborne diseases such as cholera and dysentery were also athreat.

Time is of the essence, she said. In situations such as these, children arehighly vulnerable to disease and hunger and they need immediate help tosurvive.

Prices of rice, cooking oil, charcoal and bottled water inside Burma rocketed50 per cent overnight in the face of acute demand and petrol prices havedoubled.

State television news quoted General Tha Aye reassuring people that thesituation was returning to normal. He was shown thanking volunteers andvisiting the village of Naungbo, outside Rangoon, where Buddhist monks andCatholic nuns wielding axes were clearing the ancient, fallen trees.

At a morning market in the Rangoon suburb of Kyimyindaing, there was littlesign of a return to normality.

Come, come the fish is very fresh, a fishmonger shouted to shoppers, but anangry woman snapped back: Even if the fish is fresh, I have no water to cookit!

More than 22,000 people have been confirmed dead but this figure is expected todouble and could exceed 50,000. At least 41,000 are still missing with afurther one million left homeless in the Irrawaddy delta region.

Countries from the US to Britain and Singapore swung into action with offers ofaid as a global relief operation was launched. …

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