Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Cricket: England Ready to Pace Themselves; 'We Don't Feel Need for Speed'

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Cricket: England Ready to Pace Themselves; 'We Don't Feel Need for Speed'

Article excerpt

Byline: MYLES HODGSON

STUART Broad has revealed how England intend to avoid a pace battle with South Africa and instead use the traditional arts of line and length to unsettle the tourists in the opening npower Test, writes MYLES HODGSON.

South Africa gear up for tomorrow's start to the four-Test series at Lord's with possibly the most feared pace attack in world cricket with Dale Steyn, currently rated the fastest bowler in the world, and Morne Morkel both capable of bowling at faster than 90mph.

Facing strike bowlers of such great hostility, it will be a great temptation for England to fight fire with fire and crank up their own speeds.

But 21-year-old Nottinghamshire seamer Broad, who himself was timed at 90mph during the recent one-day series defeat against New Zealand, has revealed how England will rely on accuracy rather than aggression to undermine South Africa's hopes of victory.

"I don't think we need to meet their pace and bounce at all - we need to stick to what we've done well in the past four or five Test matches," said Broad.

"We've got two world-class swing bowlers with the new ball so obviously we'll be hoping it swings and we just need to stick to the game plans we've used throughout the last Test match series.

"They worked very nicely for us there and we don't need to try and be someone we're not. I think we all bowl above 85mph which is useful, but we look to do things with the ball.

"The key for us, which we've talked about, is not to try and match pace and bounce and not be something we're not.

"If we stick to our game plans and do what we do well I'm sure we'll be successful if we do that."

Broad added: "The bowling unit came for a bowl yesterday and we sat down as a unit to chat about things. We bowled New Zealand out four times in five Test matches so we don't need to move too far from that. We've had people getting five-fors, people getting seven-fors so we don't need to change our game plans. …

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