Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Remember When: Sounds of the 70s Relived; BAND WHO SHARED LINDISFARNE'S STAGE ARE BACK

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Remember When: Sounds of the 70s Relived; BAND WHO SHARED LINDISFARNE'S STAGE ARE BACK

Article excerpt

Byline: GORDON BARR

WAY back in the 1970s, when Lindisfarne hosted their famous Christmas shows at Newcastle City Hall, it was a band from the West Country they chose to join them for the event - Stackridge.

Now, with original members "Mutter" Slater, James Warren, Andy Davis and Jim "Crun" Walters, Stackridge are back and returning to Newcastle for the first time in more than 30 years.

There's no Lindisfarne on the bill this time - instead Stackridge will be headlining at The Cluny on October 1.

The show should certainly bring back memories for the thousands of Geordies for whom Lindisfarne at Christmas was a must-attend event.

But who exactly were/are Stackridge? In 1969 a disparate band of young musicians found common ground and gathered together in a group called Stackridge Lemon.

With a constant flow of changing line-ups, finally by late 1970 Stackridge (having dropped the "Lemon") were Andy Davis, James Warren, "Mutter" Slater, "Crun" Walters, Mike Evans and Billy Sparkle. Already their somewhat eccentric mix of witty, often poignant lyrics, memorable melodies, extended instrumental passages and self-effacing stage presentation was catching the attention of the music Press and the live gig circuit.

It was this line-up that constantly toured the UK for the next three years, slowly building a devoted following and releasing three albums on MCA Records.

The band seemed to be poised to make the final breakthrough to the upper echelons of stardom.

Alas, it was not to be. Cracks began to appear in their once-tightknit family, and the original Stackridge imploded. A succession of line-up changes served to confuse both the public and music critics alike, with the band losing some of the charisma and charm of the original line-up.

Misunderstood by their new record label and misdirected by a new management team, the band did record two more critically acclaimed albums before finally splitting up in 1976.

Going their separate ways, the individuals continued to make music during the 1980s and 1990s, James and Andy gained noticeable success as electro-pop balladeers The Korgis, with two hit singles, including the Warren-penned Everybody's Got To Learn Sometime. …

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