Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

NHS Doctors 'Turned from Medicine to Mass Murder'; Suspects: Mohammad Asha and Bilal Abdulla, Right, Allegedly Plotted to Explode a Car Bomb outside the Tiger Tiger Club in Haymarket, Top. When That Failed They Plotted an Attack at Glagow Airport, the Old Bailey Heard Bomber: Kafeel Ahmed, 28, Suffered Fatal Burns in the Car Bomb Attack on Glasgow Airport and Died a Month Later

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

NHS Doctors 'Turned from Medicine to Mass Murder'; Suspects: Mohammad Asha and Bilal Abdulla, Right, Allegedly Plotted to Explode a Car Bomb outside the Tiger Tiger Club in Haymarket, Top. When That Failed They Plotted an Attack at Glagow Airport, the Old Bailey Heard Bomber: Kafeel Ahmed, 28, Suffered Fatal Burns in the Car Bomb Attack on Glasgow Airport and Died a Month Later

Article excerpt

Byline: JUSTIN DAVENPORT

TWO Muslim doctors went from treating the ill to plotting mass murder by leaving car bombs in London's West End, a court heard today.

The Mercedes cars packed with gas canisters and petrol and primed to explode were parked outside the nightclub, Tiger Tiger, in Haymarket and a busy bus stop nearby.

If they had detonated in the early hours of a busy Friday night, many people would have died, particularly young people enjoying a night out at the club, Woolwich crown court heard.

When the attacks failed, the terrorists turned their attention to a suicide mission at Glasgow Airport, but again, through good fortune, their Jeep 4x4 failed to explode.

Mohammad Asha, 27, a Jordanian national, and Bilal Abdulla, 29, from Iraq, both denied conspiracy to murder and cause explosions.

They are accused of plotting to explode the car bombs in central London in the early hours of 30 June last year.

One, a green Mercedes, was left outside Tiger Tiger which, at the time, was packed with 500 night-clubbers.

The second, a blue Mercedes, was left in Cockspur Street close to a bus stop and the court heard that one possible aim of the terrorists was to drive people being evacuated from one attack into the second blast.

Jonathan Laidlaw QC said the two doctors were part of a small cell of Islamic extremists working in Britain in the spring and summer of last year..

He said: "Their plan was to carry out a series of attacks on the public using bombs concealed in vehicles. No warnings were to be given and the cars were to be positioned in busy urban areas.

"These men were intent on committing murder on an indiscriminate and wholesale scale.

"The terrorists planned a series of explosions across Britain designed to seize attention around the world.

"No one would know where the next attack would take place so the country would be gripped with fear on a scale similar to the 7/7 transport bombings in 2005." The court heard how two cars packed with gas canisters, petrol and large quantities of nails were parked in the West End in the early hours of 29 June 2007. The bombs were fitted with a mobile phone attached to a blub encased in match heads. When a call was received on the mobile, it was designed to send a current to the bulb and the heat would then ignite the matches and the air-fuel mixture in the car.

The bombers had prepared for a technical failure because two telephones were left in the car in case one failed.

However, the court heard that the devices failed to go off because there was not enough oxygen inside the car for the petrol and the gas to ignite.

Mr Laidlaw said that the West End bombs were to be the first in a series of similar attacks. But, when the bombs failed and facing imminent discovery by the police and the security services, the terrorists switched tactics to a suicide attack. …

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