Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Does Auntie Really Always Know Best?

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Does Auntie Really Always Know Best?

Article excerpt

Byline: KEITH HANN

THE lead story in Britain's best-selling paper on Sunday was the shock news that we are all racists.

Apparently we are failing to vote for the black contestants in Strictly Come Dancing, despite the judges telling us that they are absolutely terrific.

As a matter of fact I am completely innocent of this charge, because I have never watched the programme and would rather go to a cocktail party on a yacht with Lord Mandelson than do so.

But that will surely not spare me a stern lecture from the BBC about my disgraceful behaviour.

And what if the electors of America pull the same stunt and have the temerity not to elect Barack Obama next week, after the Beeb's months of cheerleading for the man?

What it might have to say about them, in those circumstances, really does not bear thinking about. I have believed for years that the simplest way to arrive at the correct opinion on any issue is to listen to the BBC's view, then adopt the opposite one.

The US election, therefore, presents me with a bit of a problem because, if forced into a corner with a cattle prod, I would have to admit that my only reason for wanting Senator McCain to win would be the simple joy of seeing industrial quantities of egg all over the face of our national public service broadcaster.

Obama is undeniably the more inspiring orator, and it is hard to mount a convincing defence of any party in office which has made such a truly monumental mess of both economic and foreign policy.

The other big reason for reluctantly admitting the case for Obama is the dread prospect of Governor Palin inheriting the presidency.

In Britain, her selection seems an error of judgment as egregious as George Osborne's in thinking he could beat the Prince of Darkness at mud-slinging. In fact, it seems almost as bizarre as the idea of Dave Cameron sacking young George and replacing him with Kerry Katona. …

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