Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Where There's Brass, There's Brass to Make; Engineers at Corus Teesside Cast Products Have Put a New Slant on the Old Saying 'Where There's Muck, There's Brass'. A Concerted Effort to Separate and Recycle a Range of Metal Engineering Components Is Saving Time and Earning Money for the Steelmaking Company

Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Where There's Brass, There's Brass to Make; Engineers at Corus Teesside Cast Products Have Put a New Slant on the Old Saying 'Where There's Muck, There's Brass'. A Concerted Effort to Separate and Recycle a Range of Metal Engineering Components Is Saving Time and Earning Money for the Steelmaking Company

Article excerpt

A TEAM of maintenance craftsmen at Corus Teesside Cast Products (TCP) is setting a high standard on the environmental front - and earning money to boot.

Their actions have recently drawn praise from official environmental auditors who inspected the waste separation set-up at TCP's maintenance workshop.

The 44 men at the workshop make sure that every piece of scrap metal is identified and separated into one of five receptacles. Brass, copper, aluminium, steel and stainless steel materials are all collected in separate bins for recycling.

The ferrous material is recycled at TCP's steelmaking plant to produce new steel (steel can be recycled over and over again with no loss of quality). The other metals are sold for recycling elsewhere and are earning Corus around pounds 10,000 a year.

The maintenance workshop provides a service to the ironmaking, steelmaking and other related plants across TCP's site at Redcar. The scrap metal is collected by the maintenance team as they replace engineering components and repair mechanical, electrical and hydraulic equipment.

Manager in charge of the maintenance workshop, Bob Lambert, said: "The team has been trained to identify the various metals and they all understand the benefits of waste separation. Everyone has bought into it and the lads are very disciplined when it comes to separating the metals. It's become a habit."

In addition to helping the environment and earning money, waste separation is saving TCP time and money.

Said Bob: "In the old days, all the metal went into one bin and it was a time-consuming process for people to go through the bins and collect all the ferrous material for recycling at our steel plant. It had to be done because non-ferrous material like copper and brass would have contaminated the steel.

"And if you just throw away the unwanted metal, not only are you losing the scrap value but you have to pay landfill charges. …

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