Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

US Tycoon Plans to Turn City Landmark into Hotel; Grand Designs: An Artist's Impression of the Glass-Covered Extension That Would Be Added to 10 Trinity Square. the Central Rotunda Was Destroyed in the Blitz

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

US Tycoon Plans to Turn City Landmark into Hotel; Grand Designs: An Artist's Impression of the Glass-Covered Extension That Would Be Added to 10 Trinity Square. the Central Rotunda Was Destroyed in the Blitz

Article excerpt

Byline: MIRA BAR-HILLEL

AN American property magnate has unveiled plans to transform one of the City's best known office buildings into a "six-star" hotel.

Stan Thomas wants to spend [pounds sterling]150 million converting Grade II*-listed 10 Trinity Square into a 131-bedroom hotel with spa and 30 apartments.

The building, behind the Tower of London, has been earmarked to become a hotel for at least seven years but none of the plans has come to fruition.

Mr Thomas's company, Thomas Enterprises, bought the site in September 2006 from insurance firm Willis for [pounds sterling]100 million. It has now applied to the City Corporation for planning permission to go ahead with the hotel.

Rob Steul of architects Woods Bagot, designer of the proposed scheme, said: "Our vision for 10 Trinity is to create the finest hotel in London and restore one of its most important Grade II*- listed buildings. There is no other site like this in the capital, which offers a position near the City and Canary Wharf, while overlooking a World Heritage site at the Tower of London.

"We have been working with English Heritage and the City to develop a design which removes unsympathetic Sixties extensions and restores the central rotunda space to the building, which was lost during the Blitz.

"The proposed new extensions blend the listed building with a modern glassdomed extension in the courtyard. This immense 30-metre diameter central space will become the new heart of the building, and rival the scale of the Great Court of the British Museum." Designed by Sir Edwin Cooper, 10 Trinity Square was built between 1915 and 1922 and was originally the headquarters of the Port of London Authority.

Part of its main design was its decorative roof "rotunda" feature, once described as a "wedding cake".

The building hosted the inaugural reception of the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1946. …

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