Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Pounds 50m Recycling Plant Will Set Waste Management Standards; in Association with Environment Agency

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Pounds 50m Recycling Plant Will Set Waste Management Standards; in Association with Environment Agency

Article excerpt

TYNESIDE-based waste management company Graphite Resources is already nine months into building one of the world's largest steam autoclave recycling plants on the banks of the Tyne in Gateshead.

The programme is ahead of schedule and will be operational this autumn.

The steelwork structure, which covers almost five acres at Derwenthaugh, is already complete.

The flooring was finished this week and the electrics and fire supply systems are be installed.

William Thompson, director of Graphite Resources, said: "We're delighted to see how much work has progressed on site.

"The EcoParc will help to reduce our carbon footprint and produce useful, recycled products at the end of the sterilisation and sorting process.

"This project has already received widespread interest and will meet Government and local authority goals of diverting household rubbish from landfill."

The pounds 50m Graphite Resources plant uses steam autoclaving technology as an effective solution for the safe treatment of residual household and commercial waste.

The steam autoclaving system will be housed in a purpose-built facility that uses steam to sterilise and stabilise household, industrial and commercial wastes.

It will be capable of treating 320,000 tonnes of municipal solid and commercial wastes per year and will divert more than 80% of input wastes from landfill.

William said: "Derwenthaugh EcoParc is an exciting opportunity, not just for Gateshead but for the North East region as a whole. Many councils around the country are having to look at how they will deal with their residual waste in the very near future and for years to come.

"Our EcoParc site demonstrates that the private waste sector can fund new facilities, even in difficult times, giving the option to councils to use local merchant facilities, as well as or instead of councils having to find new funds. …

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