Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

{It May Be Love at Sight, but Will It } {First Last?}; {Their Eyes Meet across a Crowded Dance Floor, It's the Start of a Lifelong Love Affair, } {but How Many Couples' Initial Passion Lasts the Distance?}

Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

{It May Be Love at Sight, but Will It } {First Last?}; {Their Eyes Meet across a Crowded Dance Floor, It's the Start of a Lifelong Love Affair, } {but How Many Couples' Initial Passion Lasts the Distance?}

Article excerpt

Byline: Cherie Curtis cherie.curtis@news-mail.com.au

SISTERS Annette Greaves and Carole Cronin both believe in true love, saying that new scientific evidence is just the proof in the pudding of a recipe that has been working for many years.

"I was 17 when I fell in love with Peter," Mrs Greaves said.

"We were at ballroom dancing and he was tall, dark and handsome.

"We've been married for 26 years now and I still think he's as hot as he was then.

"We don't fight a lot, we just like being together."

A team from Stony Brook University in New York have discovered true love, using brain scans to show that a small number of couples can respond with as much passion after 20 years as most people exhibit only in the first flush of love.

The findings overturn a previously held view that love and sexual desire peak at the start of a relationship and then decline as the years go by.

Annette's daughter, Shiree, has no doubt that her parents still share the same passion that first simmered for them 26 years ago across a crowded ballroom.

"Dad was mum's first love and they're still together and still in love - my sister and I look up to them," Miss Greaves said.

"Our parents like hanging out together and when Mum was in Europe, Dad was quite sad and missed her all the time.

"I think they're great for each other and they'll be together for ever and ever."

To prove true love, scientists scanned the brains of couples who had been together for 20 years and compared them with those of new lovers.

They found that about one in 10 of the mature couples exhibited the same chemical reactions when shown photographs of their loved ones as people commonly do in the early stages of a relationship.

Previous research suggested that the first stages of romantic love, a roller-coaster ride of mood swings and obsessions that psychologists call limerence, started to fade within 15 months.

After 10 years the chemical tide has ebbed away.

The scans of some of the long-term couples, however, revealed that elements of limerence mature, enabling them to enjoy what a new report calls "intensive companionship and sexual liveliness". …

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