Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Racing's Lure Keeps Cecil in the Chase; Gift Dog Stimulates Ringuet's 70-Year Love of Greyhound Racing

Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Racing's Lure Keeps Cecil in the Chase; Gift Dog Stimulates Ringuet's 70-Year Love of Greyhound Racing

Article excerpt

Byline: Alan Kennedy alan.kennedy@capnews.com.au

GREYHOUNDS: There are few people who can boast that they have been enjoying their favourite sport for 70 years - but Cecil Ringuet can.

Each week the Gladstone-based trainer heads to Rockhampton to race his two dogs at Callaghan Park and even more amazing is the fact he is enjoying plenty of success.

The 86-year-old started racing dogs in 1938 and has seen changes as the sport has developed.

Ringuet said it wasn't unusual for a teenager to become actively interested in the sport back in the 1930's.

"(Back then) there wasn't the computer games to play or windows to break and so I thought I would do something positive," he said.

So the teenager helped out at the Gladstone track until one day he was given a dog of his own.

"It was called Knock'em Over," he recalled.

"It wasn't much good."

While the dog was past its best, Knock 'em Over did one thing and that was stimulate Ringuet's interest in the sport.

"I used to walk it three miles (4.8km) out and three miles back, six miles (9.6km) a day," he said.

That was Ringuet's first greyhound but as time went by the numbers increased until, at one stage, he was training nine, the most he has handled at one time.

Back then the racing was in Gladstone and a totally different set up to what they have at Callaghan Park today.

"When I first started racing it was on a straight piece of ground which was fenced on each side," he reflected.

At one end there were eight boxes but the dogs were run on a handicap system with a cord attached to each box to release the gate and free the greyhound. The length of the cord was dependant on the handicap with the shortest being the first to open the trap for the dog to exit.

In those early days the greyhound lure was a live hare and at the Gladstone Showground there was an enclosure where the hares were reared.

"On race day they used to catch a hare and let it go next to the boxes," Ringuet recalled.

Eight interested dogs was not the only incentive the hares needed to keep running the length of the track. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.