Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Introducing the iGeneration; Snail Mail, Dial Phone Part of Ancient History

Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Introducing the iGeneration; Snail Mail, Dial Phone Part of Ancient History

Article excerpt

Byline: Nikita Watts nikita.watts@capnews.com.au

JORDYN Battersby can't remember a time without having the internet, computers and other technology at her disposal.

The Rockhampton 19-year-old said she was brought up with ever-changing technology, which is why she is typical of the 'iGeneration'- the successors to generation Y who are under 20 and have never known life without the internet and new technology.

Jordyn said she thought her generation was different because they were more likely to accept change and take new technology on board.

"We are more open to change than the older generations and we are more comfortable around technology," she said

"But it is constantly advancing; you can do everything now with a click of a finger which is just amazing."

According to the new breakdown by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, each new generation is smarter, more likely to live in a city and less likely to observe any religion.

Assistant director of census output at the Australian Bureau of Statistics Chris Mason said they could see the leaving age for school being raised as so many jobs now required postgraduate qualification.

"One thing you can say about this generation is they are likely to be very highly educated," she said.

Jordyn is about to move to Brisbane to study pharmacy at university.

She agreed that her generation was well educated, but thought their focus on technology could impact on social skills.

"People don't realise how much more convenient our world is now," she said.

"But if you are constantly using technology you miss out on spending time with people and it seems to be more of an effort to see people in person.

"It is so much easier to send an email or text message."

At 77, Rockhampton's Norma Brinston is part of the 'oldest generation' who are described by the new breakdown as having limited educational opportunities and was less likely to use most of the new technology. …

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