Newspaper article Tweed Daily News (Tweed Heads, Australia)

Change Puts Club in a Spin

Newspaper article Tweed Daily News (Tweed Heads, Australia)

Change Puts Club in a Spin

Article excerpt

The term spinster is derived from a 14th Century Medieval English noun, spinnestere, meaning a woman who spins.

Spinning was commonly done by unmarried women, hence the word came to denote "an unmarried woman" in legal documents from the 1600s and by 1719 it was used generally for "women still unmarried and beyond the usual age for it."

For generations it was an insulting term and carried a social stigma where a female was generally portrayed as old, frumpy, unattractive, childless, without charm or sense of humour, overly pious or virtuous and living with an extended family for which they cared.

A spinster was to be pitied or mocked, unlike a bachelor whose matrimonial state was not a degrading term.

In the early 1920s several young ladies who were attending a Tweed Spinsters Club meeting in the supper room of the School of Arts building, Murwillumbah had had enough of the old title and decided to change the club's name to Tweed Tabbies.

The decision of a youthful few took the meeting by surprise and before anyone knew it the club's annual ball was renamed the Tweed Tabbies Ball. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.