Newspaper article Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia)

Human League; Take Time to See the Wonders of the World to See the Things You've Only Ever Heard of Dream Life the Way You Think It Ought to Be See Things You Thought You'd Never Ever See. (the Things That Dreams Are Made of {Ndash} Human League {Ndash} Dare)

Newspaper article Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia)

Human League; Take Time to See the Wonders of the World to See the Things You've Only Ever Heard of Dream Life the Way You Think It Ought to Be See Things You Thought You'd Never Ever See. (the Things That Dreams Are Made of {Ndash} Human League {Ndash} Dare)

Article excerpt

Byline: Tania Phillips APN Newspapers

D ARE came out in 1981 and yet it took best part of three decades for Human League to take that time and see those world wonders.

The synthesizer band from industrial Sheffield in the UK have sold more than 20 million albums in their career. Dare was a triple platinum success, staying in the UK charts for 77 weeks and spawning the massively successful single 'Don't You Want Me' (which sold two millions units on its own).

Fame hit hard and they travelled the world promoting the album and yet according to band member Susan Ann Sulley (the blonde one) life is better now the fame has died down.

Human League - the deep-voiced Philip Oakey, blonde Sulley and brunette Joanne Catherall - are coming to Australia as part of the V Festival line-up. The band, often credited as the architects of the electronic new wave genre, will travel track-by-track through their seminal album for their V set as part of a massive line-up which includes The Killers, Kaiser Chiefs, Snow Patrol, Killers, Duffy, The Kills, Howling Bells, Tame Impala, Razorlight, Elbow and M83.

The V Festival rolls onto the Gold Coast, Sunday, March 29 and tickets are still available for what is a mix of three decades of bands and styles.

"We've done V at home before so we are all looking forward to it," Sulley admitted in a thick Sheffield accent. It's before 9am in the morning Sheffield time, but she is wide awake and obviously excited about the trip.

"We have actually only been their twice, once in the early 80s and then five years ago."

Her memories of the early 80s trip are less rosy, not because of any problems with being in Australia, but just because of the fact they didn't get to really see the country.

Their first visit was at the height of their fame and Sulley, who left school to record Dare, is open and honest about what it was like to be caught up in so much fame, so much limelight. She admits although things are quieter now for the band, playing gigs around the world, but still having some anonymity is much more to her liking. …

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