Newspaper article Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia)

Colourful Journey for 'Original Thinker'; Werner Brogli January 14, 1925 {Ndash} August 26, 2008

Newspaper article Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia)

Colourful Journey for 'Original Thinker'; Werner Brogli January 14, 1925 {Ndash} August 26, 2008

Article excerpt

A brilliant inventor, painter and businessman will be sorely missed. Werner Brogli travelled the world in a time when travel was arduous; the Chinese market was untapped and visas hard to come by. He navigated the iron curtain, sold his inventions and met a few famous people like Picasso along the way.

Werner was born in Salonica (Greece) to a French mother and a Swiss father. He had an older sister and brother and a younger sister. When he was a toddler the family moved to Basel (Switzerland) where he grew up. The two brothers took over their father's engineering business and greatly expanded it. Hans was the administrator of the outfit and Werner was the engineer. He was one of these rare people who are original thinkers. He constructed mixing and homogenizing machines for the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industry and revolutionised methods of processing. Werner had well over a dozen patents to his name, mainly in his field of work but also in some totally unrelated areas; like the famous case of the "fan heater". His creativity was not restricted to his work.

He was a gifted artist. He painted all his life and very typically for him, he not only painted in oils but made interesting combinations of acrylics with art textas. Werner favoured a big format with bold colours and shapes - not for him the miniature painting! Many of the shapes were reminiscent of the technical drawings for his machines. His colour sense was amazing. He was very much a painter who captured the beauty and vibrancy of the world. His paintings hang in several hospitals, big corporate buildings and many private homes.

Werner was widely travelled. In his early days he travelled all over Europe to sell his machines. Later on he had employees doing most of the travelling but when there was a big order at stake he went there personally. He visited many of the eastern European countries in a time when the iron curtain still divided the continent and travelling there was very difficult and not without its dangers. He always came home with interesting stories to tell. One of these stories was of a trip to Moscow:

During the 60s there was only one hotel where foreigners were allowed to stay in the centre of Moscow. It was a huge square box with about a dozen floors. There was a creaky lift which didn't always work and on every floor there was a dour faced attendant sitting behind a desk noting in a big book everybody's comings and goings . Of course nobody spoke anything other than Russian and so every foreigner had an interpreter/secret service agent assigned to them. When Werner finally arrived at the hotel on this particular business trip it was already late in the evening and there was no interpreter at hand for his checking in. He was assigned a room in one of the upper floors. …

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