Newspaper article Tweed Daily News (Tweed Heads, Australia)

The Sharks That Stalk Our Tweed Coastline

Newspaper article Tweed Daily News (Tweed Heads, Australia)

The Sharks That Stalk Our Tweed Coastline

Article excerpt

Great white

THE great white shark, also known as white pointer, white shark, or white death, is an exceptionally large lamniform shark found in coastal surface waters in all major oceans. Reaching lengths of more than six metres and weighing up to 2250 kg, the great white shark is arguably the world's largest known predatory fish. While great white sharks have been responsible for fatalities in humans, they typically do not target humans as prey: for example, in the Mediterranean Sea there were 31 confirmed attacks against humans in the last two centuries, only a small number of them deadly. Many incidents seem to be caused by the animals "test-biting" out of curiosity. Great white sharks are known to perform test-biting with buoys, flotsam, and other unfamiliar objects as well, and might grab a human or a surfboard with their mouth in order to determine what kind of object it might be. Some researchers have hypothesized that the reason the proportion of fatalities is low is not because sharks do not like human flesh, but because humans are often able to get out of the water after the shark's first bite.

Tiger shark

THE tiger shark is the fourth largest predatory shark after the great white shark, Greenland shark, and Pacific sleeper shark. Mature sharks average 3.25 to 4.25 metres long and weigh 385 to 909 kg. It is found in many of the tropical and temperate regions of the world's oceans, and is especially common around islands in the central Pacific. This shark is a solitary hunter, usually hunting at night. Its name is derived from the dark stripes down its body, which fade as the shark matures. The tiger shark is a predator, known for eating a wide range of items. It has sometimes been found with man-made waste such as license plates or pieces of old tires in its digestive tract and is often referred to as "the wastebasket of the sea". It is notorious for attacks on swimmers, divers and surfers in Hawaii. Recent studies on tiger shark migration have suggested that individual tiger sharks will repeatedly attack humans, sometimes coming to the same beach at the same time each year. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.