Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Artists Express Themselves Using Watercolors; with Its Spring Show under Way, Society Looks to Expand

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Artists Express Themselves Using Watercolors; with Its Spring Show under Way, Society Looks to Expand

Article excerpt

Byline: SANDY STRICKLAND

Some paint bold geometric abstracts in strong earth tones.

Others depict multi-colored flowers, fish swimming in an emerald sea or a fierce alligator with lethal eyes.

No matter their subject matter, they are bound by their love of water-based art. These 250 members of the Jacksonville Watercolor Society come from across Jacksonville. Eighteen live in Arlington, including the president, Terese Muller.

The society, founded in 1982, wants to become more high profile and reach out to budding young artists, said Muller, who does experimental and abstract mixed media pieces.

"We need to let people know we are here and that we have artists that are on a national level," she said.

The society is presenting its spring show now through Friday, April 24, at Sweet Magnolias Gallery, 8250 Arlington Expressway. The show was juried by David Daniels, an internationally known watercolor artist and teacher who is an instructor at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays.

The society also is putting together an outreach program for elementary school children that it hopes to start in September at the University Park branch library, 3435 University Blvd. N. in Arlington.

"We want to demonstrate and teach them watercolors," Muller said. "So many of the schools might not have art next year, and children need and love art."

The society has eight meetings a year, which feature demonstrations and lectures by area and nationally known artists. The group also stages two workshops and two shows a year, such as the one at Sweet Magnolias. The frame shop and gallery is a new venue for the society, said Joyce Gabiou, publicity chairwoman.

"There's a lot of wall space so the work shows really well there," Gabiou said.

Owner Debbie Gollhofer, also an artist, said she's one of only a few independent frame shops left in Arlington. About six or seven closed citywide within the past year, she said. But Gollhofer has even expanded in recent years and would like to host more shows.

She opened her shop 12 years ago in the same small shopping center where she is now. …

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