Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

JACOB GREEN: 1938-2009; Neurologist-Author-Teacher Also Compassionate His Knowledge Was Put to Use in Trials and the Media, as Well as in His Regular Practice

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

JACOB GREEN: 1938-2009; Neurologist-Author-Teacher Also Compassionate His Knowledge Was Put to Use in Trials and the Media, as Well as in His Regular Practice

Article excerpt

Byline: JESSIE-LYNNE KERR

Jacob Green, a leading Jacksonville neurologist for 40 years who had been chief of neurology at St. Vincent's Medical Center, Baptist Medical Center and Methodist Medical Center, died Wednesday after a short bout with liver cancer. He was 70.

A memorial service will be at 4 p.m. Tuesday at the University of North Florida's University Center, 12000 Alumni Drive.

There also will be a celebration of Dr. Green's life at the family home from 4 to 8 p.m. Saturday, April 18.

A native of New York City, Dr. Green earned a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from the University of Alabama and his medical doctorate from the UA Medical School.

After serving two years as an Army medical officer, during which he was in charge of the Presidential Honor Guard, he returned to University Hospital of Alabama in Birmingham as a neurology fellow. A neurosurgical residency followed.

Dr. Green attended the Medical College of South Carolina as chief resident and teaching assistant in neurology. While there he was the first resident to be given a "Golden Apple Award" as best teacher, an honor usually given to a full-time professor.

He opened his Jacksonville practice in 1969. He trained many resident physicians in neurology at University Hospital, now Shands Jacksonville.

Dr. Green was frequently quoted by the media in stories about the effects of stun guns on the brain, when brain death occurs and other neurology topics.

When the Terri Schiavo case was pending in 2005, Dr. Green wrote an affidavit presented to Congress about her condition, saying he believed she was in a minimal conscious state.

In 1999 Dr. Green examined Joshua Phillips, convicted of killing his young neighbor, Maddie Clifton, and found he did not suffer from any medical problems and was alert, aware and a normal teenage boy.

Dr. Green also was an expert witness in the city's first "death with dignity" case in 1976, when four electroencephalograms performed on a Jacksonville housewife showed straight-line readings indicating brain death with no brain activity whatsoever. …

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