Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Pakistan Chief Hits out at Broad over His 'Lies'; PCB Chairman to Lodge Protest with ICC after Accusing Former England Star of Fabrication over Security Levels in Terrorist Attack. by David Lloyd

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Pakistan Chief Hits out at Broad over His 'Lies'; PCB Chairman to Lodge Protest with ICC after Accusing Former England Star of Fabrication over Security Levels in Terrorist Attack. by David Lloyd

Article excerpt

Byline: David Lloyd

CHRIS BROAD was today accused by the chairman of the Pakistan Cricket Board of lying about security in Lahore during Tuesday's deadly terrorist attack.

Broad, the former England batsman turned International Cricket Council referee, claims he and the match umpires were left like "sitting ducks" as bullets tore into their minibus, killing the driver and seriously wounding an official.

He has also admitted to considering conspiracy theories that Sri Lanka's cricketers and the match officials had been the victims of a set-up because of a change in the security operation.

But chief of the Pakistan Cricket Board, Ijaz Butt, has hit back angrily at the claims and says he will report Broad to the ICC.

"It is very unfortunate what he has said -- all he has said is totally untrue and fabricated," added Butt. "In any case, people who escaped the tragedy without even a scratch should not be pointing fingers at the same security men who died saving them." Seven Sri Lankan players and their English assistant coach, Paul Farbrace, were injured when the team bus came under attack near the Gaddafi Stadium.

Then Broad and the umpires, who had been travelling just behind the cricketers, were left fearing for their lives.

"We were promised high-level security and in our hour of need that security vanished and they left us to be sitting ducks," said Broad.

The PCB have launched two investigations to find out if there was a lapse in security. And Broad, speaking on his return to England yesterday, admitted to wondering why those arrangements had changed on Tuesday.

"On the first two days of the Test, both buses left at the same time with escorts," said Broad. "On Tuesday, the Pakistan bus left five minutes after the Sri Lanka bus. Why? "It went though my mind as we were leaving the hotel, 'where is the Pakistan bus? …

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