Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

& Make-Do Mend; A Return to Wartime Spirit Is Being Advocated in a Bid to Tackle Climate Change. Amy Hunt Reports

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

& Make-Do Mend; A Return to Wartime Spirit Is Being Advocated in a Bid to Tackle Climate Change. Amy Hunt Reports

Article excerpt

Byline: Amy Hunt

MAKE do and mend, watering plants with your bath water, whipping up leftover food into a tasty new meal - these were all once common practices in this country.

But with the age of disposable income our clothes, food, cars and appliances have become more and more dispensable.

Put simply, today's young people have grown up in a culture much more wasteful than the one which their grandparents and great-grandparents experienced.

Now the Energy Saving Trust, the UK's leading organisation set up to help people fight climate change, is advocating a return to the wartime spirit.

No one is suggesting we should go back to rationing or personal daily allowances, but energy experts think there are lessons people today can learn from looking to the past.

In a survey conducted as part of the Energy Saving Trust Wartime Spirit campaign, seven out of 10 people in the North East said they thought communities should club together in a similar way to the wartime effort, for example, by sharing leftover food with neighbours or car sharing, in order to help the environment.

And 60% of North East respondents thought measures such as rationing were needed to help the British public cut down on excess.

The Energy Saving Trust's campaign aims to highlight how people in the North East can take the best from the past to get tips on how to reduce waste and save energy.

A range of age groups took part in the survey which found that all of those in the North East who lived during the Second World War - 80 years old and over - are carrying on the wartime values they learned..

Steve Hunter, regional manager of the Energy Saving Trust in the North East, Yorkshire and Humberside said: "We are certainly not advocating a return to rationing or indeed enforced personal daily allowances.

However if we could adopt just a few of the practices used during the war, such as recycling bath water for watering plants, then it would go a long way towards saving energy and reducing our carbon footprint.

"North East residents who lived through the Second World War were extremely resilient in the face of extreme hardship. People had very little but they made do. …

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