Newspaper article The Northern Star (Lismore, Australia)

Folk, Roots and Rock Songstress Lucie Thorne Has Earned Critical Acclaim for Her New Album, Now Followed by a Highly Anticipated Tour; Lights on Lucie: This Rising Star Is Taking Nothing for Granted

Newspaper article The Northern Star (Lismore, Australia)

Folk, Roots and Rock Songstress Lucie Thorne Has Earned Critical Acclaim for Her New Album, Now Followed by a Highly Anticipated Tour; Lights on Lucie: This Rising Star Is Taking Nothing for Granted

Article excerpt

IT is an astounding blend of folk, roots and rock that Lucie Thorne has been writing, recording and touring around our vast nation for over a decade.

The songstress has just released her fifth offering, Black Across the Field. Critics have dubbed the album not only Thorne's finest work yet, but one of the best albums 2009 will produce. It's understandable that anticipation for the accompanying tour continues to grow among Australia's independent music scene.

"It feels like: 'Yay, one for the team!' when one of us indie musicians gets something in The Sydney Morning Herald, or gets airplay on radio," Thorne beamed.

"I've been recording and performing for 10 years and, before this album, I think the total number of reviews I had was about three."

Black Across the Field was largely put together over three days in Sydney, where Thorne met album co-producers Hamish Stuart and Dave Symes.

"Everything they brought to the project really resonated with me. Some of their ideas were totally new to me and that's the beauty of working with new people," she said.

Thorne took the Sydney sessions back to her home in Bimbaya, a tiny locality on the NSW far south coast.

Here, she built on them while still penning lyrics - the closing track Open Sky she wrote when the rest of the album was nearly finished.

"At times I wondered if this whole album was a bit too schizophrenic," Thorne giggled.

"Working with Hamish and Dave, one of our missions was to treat the songs as their own creatures and let them go in their own directions.

"The direction my work has been going in for the last few years is a little darker, a little edgier - I never really perform with acoustic guitars any more. I started exploring all the fun things you can do with electric guitars," she said.

Thorne grew up in a nurturing artistic environment, raised by a poet father and music-loving mother in the Tasmanian city of Launceston. …

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