Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Commuters Face Second Day of Strike Gridlock on Roads; Some Trains Running on Eight out of 11 Tube Lines

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Commuters Face Second Day of Strike Gridlock on Roads; Some Trains Running on Eight out of 11 Tube Lines

Article excerpt

Byline: Rashid Razaq and Peter Dominczak

LONDON was suffering another day of gridlock today as tens of thousands of cars clogged the streets to beat the Tube strike.

Passengers told of nightmare journeys, some taking nearly three hours just to drive eight miles across central London.

The evening rush hour effectively lasted four hours as people turned to their cars to get to work only to find the roads full of extra buses, taxis and minicabs.

One of the worst affected routes was from east to west as commuters turned to crammed buses or walked because of the suspension of the Central line.

It took Adrian Tiener, 29, a paralegal, almost three hours to get from Liverpool Street to Shepherd's Bush. He said: "I've had to take three different buses to get home. The worst part was standing there watching four go past without stopping because they were full. I'm absolutely exhausted because I've had to stand nearly all the way. I might as well walk next time. It makes me incredibly angry."

David Olatunde, 31, a political researcher, needed to get from Bank to Kensington for a dinner engagement so left work 90 minutes early, but said he would still struggle to arrive on time.

He said: "Ordinary working people's lives are made a misery. It's not the corporate fat-cats or politicians who are being hurt by the strike. They've got chauffeur driven cars."

Although the Northern line and Jubilee lines were kept running, commut-erin other areas were forced on to buses. The City, Oxford Circus, Piccadilly Circus and the Strand were among the most congested areas.

Nick Swaine, 23, a trainee solicitor trying to get from St Paul's to Lewisham, decided to walk to Charing Cross to catch an overground train. He said: "It's manageable for me. I can walk it to catch a train. Most people have just got on with it either on foot or by bike. It's so hard to get a job right now that I'm surprised anyone thinks they are in a position to strike."

Six out of 10 firms were disrupted by the strike, according to the London Chamber of Commerce survey. The figures show that the industrial action has been more costly than the last major strikes, in 2007, which affected 54 per cent of firms and cost the capital an estimated [pounds sterling]48 million a day in lost productivity. …

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