Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Innocent Motorist Unlawfully Killed; Grieving Family Come Face to Face with Killer

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Innocent Motorist Unlawfully Killed; Grieving Family Come Face to Face with Killer

Article excerpt

Byline: Neil McKay

AJURY returned a verdict of unlawful killing on the death of an innocent motorist killed by a drink-fuelled burglar. Yesterday's verdict, at the end of an inquest which lasted four days, came after the man responsible for the death of Billy Forrest came face to face with his victim's family.

Barry Taylor was flanked by three security guards as he gave evidence at an inquest into the death of Mr Forrest, after being brought to the hearing from his cell at Home House prison, Stockton-on-Tees. The quietly spoken dark-haired Taylor, 23, wearing a grey hooded top with dark hoops, told the hearing at Chester-le-Street magistrates court that he could remember "very little" of the events of the morning in question because he had been drinking the night before. Taylor, who is serving a 10-year prison sentence for causing the death of Mr Forrest by dangerous driving, watched impassively as he was shown video footage of the chase along the A1(M) motorway in County Durham, which ended when the Mitsubishi truck crossed the central reservation through a barrier and into the path of Mr Forrest's Peugeot.

Mr Forrest, of Ashford Grove, North Walbottle, Newcastle, was killed instantly. His partner Edna Pate, who had attended all four days of the hearing, walked out of the court in tears half way through Taylor's evidence.

Earlier on that fateful morning, July 18 last year, Taylor had finished an evening's drinking by breaking into a house in Pelaw, Chester-le-Street, County Durham, and stealing a mobile phone, a bottle of gin and the keys to the Mitsubishi, which was parked outside.

He was told by coroner Andrew Tweddle that he was "not on trial" at the inquest, and Mr Tweddle later ordered Damian Kelly, the solicitor acting for the police federation to "stop haranguing Mr Taylor". Taylor told the hearing he had refused to stop for police because "I thought I was further down the A1 than I was.

"I wanted to get home and I was worried I would run out of petrol, because the red light was on. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.