Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

Future Is in Black, White; Grazier Boyd Curran Knows Exactly What the Coming Years Should Hold for Indigenous Youth, Thanks to His Past

Newspaper article News Mail Bundaberg Qld.

Future Is in Black, White; Grazier Boyd Curran Knows Exactly What the Coming Years Should Hold for Indigenous Youth, Thanks to His Past

Article excerpt

Byline: Amy Formosa

GROWING up, Boyd Curran never felt a divide between black and white.

Raised on a farm at Capella, he thought everything about his childhood was the way it was meant to be as he climbed mountains, drove tractors and played backyard cricket and football with his buddies, many of whom were indigenous.

"We were all kids having the fun that all country kids dream of," Boyd said after speaking at last month's Indigenous Jobs and Employment Expo launch in Rockhampton.

Today the 43-year-old grazier dedicates most of his time to assisting adolescent indigenous boys and girls from some of the most remote communities in Australia, where equal opportunity is hard to come by.

Boyd, who owns two properties in Longreach, established a company, Beyond Billabong, to provide training and support for aboriginal youths.

Beyond Billabong's "Billabong to Beach" program is designed to teach indigenous kids hands-on skills, improve their confidence and ultimately get them into the workforce.

One of the inspirations behind Boyd's work is his three young children.

"Every child deserves to be loved and respected, to have a roof over their head, have an education and to feel safe and loved, and be given every opportunity to lead a positive life," Boyd said.

When Boyd was seven, he and his older brother were looked after by an indigenous woman by the name of Joan Butler for three years, who he said was "like a big sister".

"She rode bikes with us, climbed Hillview Mountain, played games and cared for us as you would family," he said.

"As children we didn't see that there was any difference with regard to race or religion."

As well as learning from the care that Joan gave, Boyd said his father Denis taught him important values he has taken on board, such as respect, honesty, manners, hard work and dignity.

Boyd started his work for indigenous people in 2000 when he was living in Mt Isa. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.