Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Climate Activists Look Down on City; CAMP BLACKHEATH ECO PROTESTERS PITCH THEIR TENTS ON THE SITE OF PEASANTS' REVOLT

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

Climate Activists Look Down on City; CAMP BLACKHEATH ECO PROTESTERS PITCH THEIR TENTS ON THE SITE OF PEASANTS' REVOLT

Article excerpt

Byline: Rashid Razaq, Kiran Randhawa and Justin davenport

HUNDREDS of climate activists swooped on Blackheath this afternoon as the location of the week-long Climate Camp was finally revealed.

Protesters arrived by bicycle from meeting points all over London to set up the camp on a hill overlooking Docklands and Canary Wharf.

The site was kept top secret until the last moment and was texted to the protesters.

Organisers said the venue symbolised the financial and corporate centres of power, and was within the flood plains of the Thames, which activists warned was at risk of bursting its banks as climate change escalated.

One organiser said: "Today the Camp for Climate Action is setting up camp at the doorstep of the economic and political systems that are fuelling catastrophic climate change."

Activists began arriving at a wide open green space on Blackheath bordered by Hare and Billet Road and the A2 at around 2.30pm.

More than 20 white vans and lorries were in place and a 500-metre temporary wire fence erected.

Some demonstrators had already put up tripods made from metal scaffolding poles at the entrance to the camp with a banner carrying the words "Capitalism is crisis".

Only one police vehicle with two senior officers was present and they were in discussions with organisers. One local said an ice-cream van arrived before them.

Demonstrator, Ed Thompson, 23, a teacher from Canterbury, said: "Blackheath is a perfect location for us to send our message this year as it overlooks the City, which has caused many of the problems facing society today."

Joiner Henry Twigger, 41, from Nottingham, said: "It's certainly big enough for the 3,000 people we are expecting. We are not fenced in by the police but by ourselves."

Law student Kirsty Schneeberger, 24, cycled from her home in Camden, and said: "The cycle ride through London was really great and really raised awareness of what we are doing."

The first of the campers arrived on bicycles at the entrance of the site, close to historic Greenwich Park.

The camp is on common land, where in 1381, preacher John Ball gave what was probably the country's first speech against class oppression. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.