Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Proud Names They Bear; {Honourable Stories Behind the Titles of Our New Bridges } {{ldquo}Every Year We Put Flowers Down for Francis{rdquo}}

Newspaper article The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia)

Proud Names They Bear; {Honourable Stories Behind the Titles of Our New Bridges } {{ldquo}Every Year We Put Flowers Down for Francis{rdquo}}

Article excerpt

Byline: KIERAN CAMPBELL kieran.campbell@capnews.com.au

DOROTHY Cranston doesn't have too many family members who have had landmarks named after them.

By tomorrow, a new bridge across a creek at the back of Dorothy's west Rockhampton home will officially wear her late father's name: John William Berry.

Mr Berry is one of three people who will be honoured tomorrow when Rockhampton Regional Council officially names four new bridges.

The bridge over Belmont Creek, north of the city, will be named the John William Berry Bridge.

At Alligator Creek, north of Rockhampton, the bridge will be named Francis Lindley Bridge.

The bridge over Perkins Creek will be named John Smith Bridge.

Lastly, the bridge over Banwan Creek will be the Banwan Creek Bridge.

John William Berry

John was a keen weather forecaster and spent 75 years sending records of rain fall and temperatures to the Bureau of Meteorology.

Born on May 13, 1890, he moved to Rockhampton in 1897 and was taught at the Allenstown School.

In 1917 John enlisted in the Australian Imperial Forces and served with the 41st Battalion in France.

On September 29, 1918, while fighting in France, John was hit by machine gun fire and wounded.

He was sent back to England to recover and on March 7, 1919 he returned to Australia and was discharged from the AIF shortly after.

John farmed his property and from his land west of Rockhampton he recorded weather for the bureau.

On December 1, 1981, he was awarded a certificate of appreciation, a painting and an electronic print-out of his records in recognition of his contribution to the BOM.

John lived at his property, Island Holme, for more than 75 years, but the property itself had been in the family for 102 years.

The Belmont Road creek crossing, on Belmont Creek north-west of Rockhampton, was maintained for many years by John and his sons and is where the bridge was resurrected with his name. …

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