Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

HOUSE OF GOD TO HOUSE OF FRASER; It Has Been 15 Years since Supermarkets, DIY Chains and Department Stores Were First Allowed to Throw Open Their Doors for Sunday Trading. Now Retail Groups Want to Be Allowed to Open for Even Longer. ROBERT WEATHERALL Spoke to Those Who Want Keep Sunday Special and Those Who See It as Just Another Day to Splash the Cash

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

HOUSE OF GOD TO HOUSE OF FRASER; It Has Been 15 Years since Supermarkets, DIY Chains and Department Stores Were First Allowed to Throw Open Their Doors for Sunday Trading. Now Retail Groups Want to Be Allowed to Open for Even Longer. ROBERT WEATHERALL Spoke to Those Who Want Keep Sunday Special and Those Who See It as Just Another Day to Splash the Cash

Article excerpt

IF you were to walk down any high street on any given Sunday 16 years ago, you would have been greeted with a very different picture to what you see today.

Shops would have shutters pulled down and the streets would be deserted. The occasional bus ferrying people to see family and friends would be the only flurry of activity.

But once where people flocked to worship at the House of God, now they are just as likely to worship at the House of Fraser.

Shopping has become one of our favourite leisure activities and members of the My Sunday My Choice lobby group argue that limiting opening times to only six hours is a restriction on people's personal liberty.

The group, which is made up from massive chains such as B&Q, Tesco and Ikea, argues that ideas have changed in the last 15 years and now is an appropriate time to do away with restricted trading hours.

But according to Peter Lynas of the Keep Sunday Special campaign, such a move wouldn't be welcomed by the public.

He said: "We have commissioned independent surveys by the respected NOP group and the vast majority of people see no need to change the current rules."

Figures from shop workers union USDAW show that there are 1.5m people with children who work in a shop on a Sunday and 1m people who work both Saturday and Sunday.

Mr Lynas said: "Since Sunday trading came in, the one day in the week which was guaranteed family time has been taken away.

"There were certain guarantees which were put in place about workers being given the right to opt out, but what we have seen is that employees, especially in the current climate, don't want to be seen as being awkward."

The Sunday Trading Act only allows stores with more than 3,014sq ft to trade for six hours between 10am and 6pm on a Sunday.

However despite the seemingly tough rules, some companies are starting to find loopholes.

Garages don't come under the restrictions and in recent years there have been a growth in the number of petrol stations that also double up as a small supermarket. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.