Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Duval Students Expanding Their Horizons in Arabic; LEARNING CULTURE San Jose Elementary Is Taking Part in the District's New Language Program

Newspaper article The Florida Times Union

Duval Students Expanding Their Horizons in Arabic; LEARNING CULTURE San Jose Elementary Is Taking Part in the District's New Language Program

Article excerpt

Byline: TOPHER SANDERS

Ten-year-old Caleb Townsend is well beyond learning his alphabet, but on Wednesday he and other students at San Jose Elementary School were learning the alphabet all over again - this time in Arabic.

Caleb and 39 other students in San Jose's third, fourth and fifth grades are part of Duval County Public Schools' new Arabic language program. The students spend about 30 minutes, four days a week learning the basics of Arabic, spoken in countries like Iraq and Saudi Arabia and the language of the Qur'an.

Caleb said the class is fun.

"It gives me a chance to learn a new culture," he said, "and I get to talk a different language."

The program adds to a strong international culture at San Jose, where the student body represents 35 countries and 35 languages. It is taught by Essam Elia, a native of Egypt who is in his ninth year teaching English language learners at San Jose.

CULTURAL GROWTH

Elia said he has wanted to create an Arabic class for several years and got his chance this year when the district decided to push the initiative forward.

"I hope by the end of this year, they'll learn more about the Middle East [and] the culture," Elia said.

Joanne Davis, supervisor of World Languages for Duval schools, said she recognizes some people may have a negative reaction to young people learning Arabic - although the district has received no complaints - but views the program as an opportunity and way to combat cultural ignorance.

"Unfortunately, it's a lack of knowledge that really causes so many issues and concerns that we have," Davis said, "so Essam will include cultural components as well."

Arabic is considered one of the tougher languages to master, so being introduced to it at a young age is beneficial, Elia said.

Before beginning an exercise on Wednesday, he asked the class if they were ready to begin.

"N' am!" the students yelled, the Arabic word for yes.

Of Elia's 40 students, seven have Arabic backgrounds, like 9-year-old Abigail Farah.

"It comes very naturally to me because my grandmother was actually born in Palestine, present-day Israel," Abigail said.

But she still enjoys the class.

"I just like saying all the fun words," Abigail said, "because when you write it's like pictures not letters. …

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