Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

TOMORROW'S PARTY PEOPLE; after a Decade of Embracing the Weird and Wonderful, the Rock Festival at Butlins Has Now Got the Simpsons Involved; SOUND CHECK

Newspaper article The Evening Standard (London, England)

TOMORROW'S PARTY PEOPLE; after a Decade of Embracing the Weird and Wonderful, the Rock Festival at Butlins Has Now Got the Simpsons Involved; SOUND CHECK

Article excerpt

Byline: David Smyth

AFTER 10 years of ever-growing cult status, the All Tomorrow's Parties festival has become a thrice-yearly UK event, has expanded into the US and Australia, and is now the comeback destination of choice for all manner of reformed and long-absent bands. This is despite largely taking place in out-ofseason Butlins resorts.

Now the weekender for people who hate conventional music festivals has made its most unexpected move yet and booked someone that the man on the street has actually heard of - The Simpsons' creator Matt Groening will pick the bands one weekend next May.

Groening might seem an odd choice when the other upcoming ATPs are to be curated by reunited cult favourites My Bloody Valentine and Pavement. If it was up to Homer Simpson it would be Grand Funk Railroad all the way. But the 55-year-old Groening reportedly has an extensive personal collection of the kind of experimental art rock that causes attendees to lose cardigan buttons with excitement, and has already organised an ATP event in Long Beach California in 2003.

Back then he booked the likes of Sonic Youth, The Mars Volta, The Shins and Captain Beefheart's newly reformed Magic Band, so it's in safe hands. Tickets go on sale today.

But if you'd rather be at home watching Futurama, you're not alone. ATP's obscure line-ups are more likely to feature instrumental doom metal by terrifying regular participants Sunn O))) than anyone on the A-list at Absolute Radio, and seem calculated to make 99 per cent of the population sprint towards the welcoming arms of the V Festival. It's a strategy that has allowed it to remain sponsorship-free and created a loyal audience that really, really loves it.

Attendees are music's geekiest strain, the types who have elitist music website Pitchfork.com as their homepage if they're not already contributors. They're so passionate that some 200 of them submitted amateur footage to be used in a new film marking ATP's 10th anniversary. …

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