Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Truly Standing the Test of Time; It Was Back to the Eighties and Spandau Ballet Last Night. SUSAN ROBERTSON Reports on How the Boys Fared in Front of a Fanatical Tyneside Audience

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Truly Standing the Test of Time; It Was Back to the Eighties and Spandau Ballet Last Night. SUSAN ROBERTSON Reports on How the Boys Fared in Front of a Fanatical Tyneside Audience

Article excerpt

Byline: SUSAN ROBERTSON

WHEN I heard Spandau Ballet had reformed I couldn't wait to see my teen hearthrobs in action.

The only question was if their magic was still pure Gold or had the sparkle been lessened with the passage of time and all the trials, both in court and in life the Tony Hadley, Gary Kemp, Martin Kemp, Steve Norman and John Keebles had been through? It took just two beats and one minute to provide an emphatic answer.

A montage of video clips as the curtain opened and Spandau launched the gig with To Cut A Long Story Short followed by Visions.

As the lights turned blue Norman swapped guitar for sax and Highly Strung with a perfect last note from Tony. "Where have you been for the last 20 years?" asked the frontman as hit followed hit including two of my favourites followed, Only When You Leave and Fly for You.

The boys were clearly having a ball and throughout they had banter with the audience - mainly enthusiastic middleagers of both sexes.

As you would expect, all the old favourites were augmented by some fresh material. I heard the new single Once More a couple of weeks ago on the radio part way through and realised who it was when I heard the sax solo. Quite a contemporary sound but with all the original flavour of a Spandau track which was stunning live.

There were 'Aahs!' from the crowd as footage rolled of the lads in their heyday on holiday, in concert and backstage as they performed Round and Round.

Man In Chains and for the first time Martin got the crowd clapping along as Gary paid homage pointing to Tony commenting on his fab vocals and reminiscing about a previous trip to Tyneside at the City Hall.

It was followed by a duet between Gary and Tony at the front to give the band a break - The Pride - just Tony's voice and Gary's lyrical guitar accompaniment ending with a handshake showing all previous acrimony was well and truly forgotten. …

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