Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia)

Food for Thought in Trend Healthy Bid to Promote Local Buying; Movement Opposes Fast Meal Options

Newspaper article Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia)

Food for Thought in Trend Healthy Bid to Promote Local Buying; Movement Opposes Fast Meal Options

Article excerpt

Byline: MEGAN MACKANDER

IN a fast-paced world, people want their food quick, fast and ready to eat.

But the Slow Food movement is becoming the new trend on the Sunshine Coast.

No, slow food does not mean waiting an hour for a meal to be served. It is about slowing down and being mindful of where food comes from to support local farmers.

Slow Food was established world-wide 20 years ago to counteract fast food, the disappearance of locally produced food and people's dwindling interest in the food they ate.

This Thursday, the Sunshine Coast will celebrate local small-scale producers during the inaurgural Terra Madre Day celebrations.

Slow Food Sunshine Coast Hinterland has organised a number of events for the day.

Founder Julie Shelton said residents could participate in the Eat In or Eat Out festivities.

aThe Eat Out theme has about half a dozen local restaurants on board that will feature specialised dishes using local produce,a she said.

aThe core message of Terra Madre Day is to source food locally and acknowledge the people who have worked so hard to produce the food that we eat and enjoy.a

Restaurants and cafes across the Coast have agreed to showcase the gourmet meals that can be made from local produce such as cheeses and vegetables.

aPeople who can't eat out and get to a cafA[c] or restaurant can participate in Eat In where they can come along to designated parks and bring food that are from things sourced locally or grown at home themselves,a Julie said.

aThis is the first of what we hope to be an annual, global celebration that gets people thinking and caring more about food.

aI would like to see people think about the food chain all the way to the soil or the paddock.a

Julie was an organic dairy farmer before she established the Sunshine Coast Hinterland branch of Slow Food four months ago.

Naturally, she was passionate about supporting local farmers.

aFarmers are struggling and there are not enough cafes and restaurants using local resources,a Julie said. aIt is easier for local producers to send out one batch to Sydney or Brisbane and then redistribute the stock from there rather than transporting to individual businesses. …

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