Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Dawn's Starring Role Backstage; WAITING in the Wings of the Scottish Ballet, It's Tyneside-Born Dawn Ellis Hoult's Job to Make Sure Things Run Smoothly. JOANNE BUTCHER Meets Her

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Dawn's Starring Role Backstage; WAITING in the Wings of the Scottish Ballet, It's Tyneside-Born Dawn Ellis Hoult's Job to Make Sure Things Run Smoothly. JOANNE BUTCHER Meets Her

Article excerpt

Byline: JOANNE BUTCHER

WHEN most people dream of joining the theatre, they imagine taking centre stage in a blaze of fame and glory.

But not Dawn Ellis Hoult. Her passion isn't being on the stage - but behind it.

She might be left waiting in the wings as the dancers take the limelight, but Dawn's role is arguably the most important in the theatre.

As assistant stage manager with the Glasgow-based Scottish Ballet, the 24-year-old makes sure every show runs like clockwork.

"People always seem to think that I wanted to be an actor or a dancer, and it hasn't worked out, so I've gone backstage," said Dawn, who was brought up in Heaton, Newcastle.

"But although I was in plays when I was in college I never really felt comfortable on stage.

"I was always much more interested on what was going on behind the scenes."

Dawn took a BTEC in technical theatre at North Tyneside College before going to Glasgow's Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama to study for a degree in technical and production art.

She first started at the Scottish Ballet, Scotland's award-winning national dance company, doing part-time backstage work on their Christmas production of Cinderella.

Now, the former Heaton Manor School pupil works full time with the company and accompanies the troupe of world-class dancers as they leap and pirouette across the globe.

"Stage managing can be quite a demanding job," Dawn said. "When you are 'on the book', you are basically running the show.

"You have to concentrate, follow the music and give everyone their cues at the right time. There is a lot of pressure - everyone is relying on you.

"The stage manager is the first point of contact for cast and crew. If something goes wrong, it's up to you to give the call on what to do about it, quickly.

"I do still get very nervous before the first few performances of a new production, but fortunately I've not had to stop a show yet."

While everything looks serene and elegant onstage, behind the curtains it can be a hectic race against time.

"If someone's costume rips or a prop breaks on stage, we have to fix it before they are due back on," said Dawn. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.