Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Working to Protect Vulnerable People; ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE: How the Vetting and Barring Scheme Will Help Protect Children and Vulnerable Adults across the Country

Newspaper article The Journal (Newcastle, England)

Working to Protect Vulnerable People; ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE: How the Vetting and Barring Scheme Will Help Protect Children and Vulnerable Adults across the Country

Article excerpt

THE new Vetting and Barring Scheme (VBS) aims to prevent those who present a risk of harm from undertaking certain paid or volunteer work with children or vulnerable adults.

The scheme was developed following the Soham murders of Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman by Ian Huntley. Huntley worked as a caretaker at a local school and although police and other agencies had serious concerns about his previous behaviour, there was no overriding mechanism to ensure this information was shared with potential employers.

The subsequent Bichard Inquiry recommended that all those who work or volunteer with vulnerable groups should be registered, so that people who pose a risk are less likely to slip through the safeguarding net.

In general from November 2010, anyone who wants to start working or volunteering regularly with children or vulnerable adults must apply to register with the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA). The ISA makes decisions over who should be barred from working with vulnerable groups and maintains two barred lists, one for children and one for vulnerable adults.

As well as input such as criminal records data, the ISA will receive information from a wide variety of sources, including the police and social services.

Employers and professional regulators also have a legal duty to refer to the ISA any information about individuals who may pose a risk of harm to vulnerable groups.

The scheme applies to England, Wales and Northern Ireland - a parallel scheme is being developed in Scotland.

Improving the system The VBS will introduce a new vetting system that is simpler and more comprehensive than previous arrangements. As well as replacing three old barred lists with two aligned lists, the scope of the new Vetting and Barring Scheme will be much wider than the previous arrangements including many more roles - for example, most NHS jobs will be covered.

There will be more pre-employment checking, helping to ensure that those known to present a risk of harm to children or vulnerable adults do not get to work with those groups in the first place. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.