Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Memory of United Great Will Live on through Campaign; TRIBUTES TO CHARLIE CROWE AS FAMILY VOW TO CONTINUE ALZHEIMER'S WORK

Newspaper article Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)

Memory of United Great Will Live on through Campaign; TRIBUTES TO CHARLIE CROWE AS FAMILY VOW TO CONTINUE ALZHEIMER'S WORK

Article excerpt

Byline: KIM CARMICHAEL

NEWCASTLE United great Charlie Crowe's legacy will live on through fundraising in his name, his family said today.

Fans' favourite Charlie, famed for his part in the 1951 FA Cup final, passed away on Saturday night aged 85.

Charlie was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 1998 and moved to care home Hunter Hall in Wallsend.

Last year his family launched the Charlie Crowe Scanner Appeal, which aimed to raise enough money to buy a new scanner to help research into the condition at Newcastle University. Charlie was born on October 30, 1924, in Walker, Newcastle, and spent the majority of his career at his hometown club Newcastle United.

The highlight of his career was when he took part in the 1951 FA Cup final, which saw Newcastle United take on Blackpool.

Two goals from Jackie Milburn won the cup for the Magpies against the club, which had Stanley Matthews as the star of their own cup run.

United also came close to being the first club in the 20th Century to do the league and cup double, but they finished fourth.

After the victory the club brought the trophy home to Tyneside to a welcome by 200,000 fans, and Charlie got into trouble for borrowing the cup and keeping it for two weeks.

Charlie's death leaves Vic Keeble as the only surviving player from United's FA Cup winning teams of 1951, 1952 and 1955.

Charlie contracted Septicaemia and was in a coma before he passed away on Saturday at the Redesdale Palliative Care Unit in North Tyneside, where he was treated for one week.

His daughter Lesley Edmondson, 62, said: "Dad suffered so much, especially over the last few years and it was heartbreaking to watch. Now he finally has peace.

"My grandson Jamie, who is 18 and a talented footballer himself, adored Dad and he summed it up when he told me that he imagined Dad getting his boots on again and running onto the pitch where the rest of the team are waiting for him.

"That's what I told Dad when he was in a coma at the end and I'm sure he heard me.

"We had a chance to say goodbye at the end, which we are grateful for. He has peace now and can have a proper game at last. …

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