Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Youth Justice Has Change on the Menu; Reparation Work Helps Young Offenders Take Responsibility for Their Behaviour and Pay for Their Crimes: ADVERTISING FEATURE

Newspaper article Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England)

Youth Justice Has Change on the Menu; Reparation Work Helps Young Offenders Take Responsibility for Their Behaviour and Pay for Their Crimes: ADVERTISING FEATURE

Article excerpt

At the end of last year, the new Youth Rehabilitation Order (YRO) was introduced to allow judges and magistrates to combine punishment and rehabilitation in the most effective way.

Courts can choose from a menu of 18 options including treatment for drug or substance misuse, help with mental health problems, reparation work in the community, supervision and curfews. Courts will take into account the seriousness of the offence and the circumstances of the young person.

Young offenders must complete all parts of their sentence and keep out of trouble. The option of reparation work will force young offenders to undertake work, either 'directly' for the victim, or 'indirectly' for the benefit of the wider local community. Reparation is designed to help young offenders understand the consequences of their offending and take responsibility for their behaviour. The aim - as well as being a means of punishment - is to give young people skills and experience, not create cheap labour to put someone else out of a job.

Reparation work can involve assisting charities and schools by, for instance, assisting in day centres for the elderly or youth clubs, clearing churchyards and public spaces or cleaning, painting and improving railway stations. Where possible, reparation should relate to the offence committed. For example, if the offender was found guilty of daubing graffiti, the reparation requirement might make the young person to remove that graffiti.

A new aspect of reparations work is the Making Good scheme, which invites members of the public and community groups to suggest community reparation activities that young offenders could undertake. 'Making Good' gives local people the chance to suggest how young offenders in their area should make amends for their crimes through reparation work - and helps the young person to understand the impact of their crime.

It's in everyone's interests to intervene early and tackle youth anti social behaviour and crime effectively. But for those who have committed offences and are taken to court, a tough community punishment can be the most effective way of turning them away from a life of crime. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.